Awesome Gig Pics of Maxine, Dave and Pete…


My friend and professional photographer Arsenio Santos was so kind to take pictures of our event.  As you may recall, the first part of the show was a selection of acoustic songs.  Here we see myself on acoustic bass, Dave on his 12 string, and Maxine vocals.  Thanks Arsenio, the pics look awesome!  Looking forward to seeing the other pictures!

This is my buddy Dave.

Lovely and talented Maxine.

More pics of the lovely Maxine...she's much easier on the eyes than Dave and I.

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Song Sample and Gig Date!


Just a quick post this time.  My band, Below the Belt, will be playing at the Greyfriars Pub in Oakville, Ontario, Canada on Saturday March 3rd from 7-10 pm.

Exciting, because we will be playing 24 songs (2 full sets, we usually only get to play one set).  Also, my son’s band will be opening for us with a set of original material.  They are called Sticks and Stones and they are incredible.

My band does fun covers of songs from the 60’s all the way to present time.  We do songs by artists such as the Rolling Stones, Beatles, Big and Rich, John Mayer, Maroon 5, The Clash, the Tragically Hip, The Black Crowes etc.

We will be raising money for a organization called We Listen International.  This organization, headed by my friend Warren Esterbrooks, provides professional education, training and consultative services for professionals around the world in the fields of Auditory-Verbal Therapy, Auditory Rehabilitation, and Auditory Learning who work with children, teens and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families.

And now for your listening enjoyment, here is a sample of my band covering Stuck in the Middle With You.  Click Here.

What Does a Cochlear Implant Sound Like?


It has been almost 7 years since I received my Cochlear Implant.  However, it seems just like yesterday.  I can still remember every detail from the time of surgery, to my first activation, and all the steps along the way to the restoration of my hearing.

I was not always deaf.  I was born with normal hearing.  I did not have meningitis, nor do I have any family history of hearing loss.  The only thing notable thing in my clinical history was that I had a series of painful ear infections.  It is likely one of those infections that caused the damage to my inner ear.

I began using hearing aids at the age of 5.  Over time, my hearing continued to worsen.  By the time I was in high school, my hearing loss was moderate-severe.  In University, my loss was in the severe range.  Interestingly, I did not begin using an FM system until my third year of University.  I simply did not know such devices even existed. I wish I was made aware of FM systems earlier, as I suffered academically from not hearing well.  In high school with smaller class sizes, I was an Honour Role student.  But in first year University, my average dropped to 60% and my initial hopes for studying Medicine were dashed.

I vowed to ensure that all people with hearing loss become fully informed of all the hearing devices or other forms of help that are available.  I did not want to see others struggle needlessly from hearing loss.  Thus, I decided to pursue studying Audiology and make this my personal mission.

But back to my original story about my CI.  Even though my loss was now in the severe range, hearing aids and FM systems provided me with considerable assistance.  My word identification scores were still in the 70% range.  However, as I crossed the line into a profound loss of hearing, my ability to understand speech started to diminish considerably.  By the time I became a candidate for a Cochlear Implant, my word identification scores were 0% for my right ear and 10% for my left ear.  Phone use was virtually impossible.  I struggled to lipread every word.  It was exhausting to try to carry on a  conversation.

I received my Cochlear Implant from the excellent surgery and audiology team at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto.  The surgery process went without a hitch.  I was out of the hospital the next day, and took a only a few days off from work.

After a month of healing, I went for my initial programming session.  I thought that I would be well prepared for this appointment.  After all, I am a trained Audiologist.  I have counseled patients myself about not having unrealistic expectations, especially on the first day.  But I knew there were some patients who could hear speech even on the first day of activation.  I wanted to be one of those people.  I felt I was entitled to be one of those people.  I was wrong.

After the initial Mapping was done, I listened to speech for this first time.  And it sounded like…GARBAGE.  Specifically, it sounded like R2D2.  It was just all a bunch of beeps and chirps.  I drove home that day and decided a nice bottle of single malt Scotch was needed.  I was feeling every emotion from anger, to bewilderment, to sadness.

But to make a long story short, the changes that occur over the next 6 months were rapid.  After about 2 weeks, the implant started sounding like Sammy the Snake hissing sentences into my head.  That’s better than R2D2.  Then it changed to Alvin from the Chipmunks.  Next it started to sound like a young Jerry Lewis.  Now it sounds pretty normal, at least to me.

My word identification score started to rapidly improve.  I cannot recall all of my scores, but after about 6 months I was understanding about 70% of monosyllabic words in isolation and 100% of words in sentences.  After one year, my monosyllabic word identification score for words in quiet improved to 96%.  I was and continue to be completely blown away by this.  After all, I started hearing just beeps and chirps.

Given that I recall having much better hearing, I can describe the difference between hearing through a CI vs a hearing aid.  Basically, when I had enough hearing to benefit from a hearing aid, speech and music sounded full and rich.  But as my hearing loss progressed, all I heard from the hearing aid were low pitches.  Everyone sounded like they had mashed potatoes in their mouths.

The CI sounds very crisp and precise.  I hear all the high frequency fricatives (s, sh, f, th etc) quite well.  I have been told that my speech has improved immensely, although I never realized that my speech production was deteriorating with my progressive hearing loss.  In hindsight, it makes sense.

Music and hearing in noise remained problematic.  To help with hearing in noise, we can get the same improvements hearing aid users get from the use of Directional Microphones or FM systems.  I use both with my CI and it helps.

For me personally, the use of a hearing aid in my non-implanted ear has helped with music perception.  Without a hearing aid, I can barely hear any bass at all. Bass makes music sound full and rich.  On the other hand, the treble I get from the CI makes speech and music sound clear and crisp.  Thus the CI on its own is fine for speech, but makes music sound like it is coming out of a small radio rather than a big stereo.  The hearing aid on its own sounds pretty bad for any type of sound, speech or music.  Combined with the CI, it does not help with speech, but does give music a richer deeper sound.

For those of you considering a Cochlear Implant, my single best word of advice to you is be patient.  Do not expect miracles, especially on the first day.  The improvements will come as your brain relearns to makes sense of these electrical signals.

Please remember too, that everyone is unique.  While my experiences are not uncommon, your pace of improvements and the final levels you reach could be better or worse than me.

I am so glad I took the step of getting a Cochlear Implant and would do it all over again in a heartbeat.

10 New Years Resolutions for People with Hearing Loss


Here we go again…its that time of year where we make all sorts of cliche New Years resolutions.  We all make the typical “lose weight” “exercise more” types.  Those are permanently affixed to every year’s list of resolutions for me.

As a person with significant hearing loss, there are some things which we can do that will make our lives more enjoyable.  So here are some suggestions for New Years Resolutions.

  1. Develop and Enjoy a Hobby.  As people with hearing loss, our communication challenges affect us in so many ways.  Its easy to let this dominate our lives.  So this is why I put this one at the top of the list of resolutions, because I feel it critical to develop and nurture our entire person.  For me, I have taken up Archery.  I love how archery calms me.  In addition, It requires much practice and skill, so it challenges me.  And it completely takes my mind off my hearing loss.
  2. Learn to use a new Communication Device.  Have you tried captioning on your TV?  Have you tried an FM system?  Do you use your different programs on your hearing aid?  This year, make it a goal to pick a device and learn to use it well.
  3. Learn a New Communication Technique.  There are all sorts of behavioral ways we can learn to communicate better.  Technology is only part of the story.  Ask yourself questions such as “Do I always make sure I sit with the light behind me so I can see other people’s faces better for lip-reading?”, or “Do I use a specific clarification rather than just saying what or pardon me?”.  Pick just one technique and try to apply this as much as you can.
  4. Take Action. This involves learning to be assertive, but not aggressive.  I need to work on being a bit more assertive.  For example, when I sit in a restaurant, sometimes I do not pick the best seat.  The best seat would be one in which I can see as many faces as possible and where the background noise is behind me.  All I need to do is just say to my dinner party “Do you mind if I sit there?  It would help me communicate better.”
  5. Learn to Accept Things.  Even with all the best technology and communication techniques, there are certain situations that may still be too challenging.  For example, even though I may go out to a bar with friends, I cannot hear all the communication from all the people in my group.  With the use of my FM system, I can, however, have conversations with one person at a time.  Therefore I have learned to accept this limitation.  I wish I could hear all the jokes zipping around me, but I can’t.
  6. Develop Calmness.  Again, another one I need to work on.  I am getting better, but sometimes I do get frustrated by my limitations.  Normally, this drive I have to not let this hearing loss limit me is a good thing.  It has driven me to become an audiologist, and learn to use all sorts of technologies and strategies to communicate better.  But sometimes, we might hit a brick wall.  I can get worked up by this and boil inside and its not healthy.  This year, when I get that feeling, I will try to draw upon the calmness I am learning from Archery. (See how this all ties in together?)
  7. Teach a Loved One Communication Strategies.  Communication is a two way street.  I would say that perhaps unlike other disabilities, hearing loss always affects your love ones.  Talking always involves at least one other person and as such, requires changes from communication partners.  So take some time to teach one “significant other” some techniques.  For example, my niece is likely the fastest talking teenager on planet earth.  It is incredible how many words per minute she can say.  I have worked on getting her to slow down when talking with me. Interestingly, she is now working as a waitress saving money for University next year and she has found that she does her job better when she slows down her speech for her customers.  Win win!!
  8. Plan a Dinner with Good Communication Techniques.  This one is a fun project.  Scout out a restaurant that is low noise and has good lighting.  Pick out a table that also fits these two criteria.  Pick out a seat that allows you to see everyone and where your back is towards the background noise.  Decide the number of people in the dinner party that you comfortably can communicate with.  Think about the communication devices you will be using, such as an FM system.  Think about the request for clarification techniques you will employ. And then make a reservation and enjoy!
  9. Read.  For the majority of us, our sense of vision is just fine.  Our eyes are an unimpaired portal to information.  The more we read, the more we keep in touch with the world around us.  Topics become more familiar, which assists greatly in lip-reading and hearing.
  10. Take Time for Family.  Here’s another one for me.  I get so wrapped up in dealing with my own hearing loss issues, that I sometimes do not see how things are with my family.  Be sensitive to how your hearing loss affects your other family members.  Be thankful for the things they are already doing to help you.  Also, your family members have things happening to them, both good and bad.  Make sure we take time to listen to them, rejoice in their successes, and help them with their challenges.  Its not always just about us.