Fundraising Event for Dog Guides


SR-AccessibilityAwarenessEvent-01

Another quick blog posting is needed.  Spring Rolls will be organizing a event called Accessibility Awareness Week.  They will be donating 20% of their proceeds to the Lions Foundation of Canada.  As some of you may know, Lions Foundation trains various dogs to assist people with visual or hearing impairments, physical challenges etc. 

Click here for more information about Lions Foundation of Canada Dog Guides Program. 

Again, I wish to thank the management of Spring Rolls for their generosity and their assistance in bringing greater awareness to this issue.

Resolution Acheived.


This will be a quick blog post.  I have been in contact with the management at Spring Rolls and they have done the following.

  1. The have apologized for what transpired.
  2. They have agreed to add the appropriate signs stated that Service Dogs are welcome.
  3. They have agreed to provide sensitivity and awareness training for their staff.

Note that this is not just about complying with the Ontario Human Rights Code but also the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.  Specifically, as of January 2012, all providers of goods and services must comply with the Customer Service Standards.  I urge you to click this link for more details. 

I am pleased that Spring Rolls plans to take the necessary steps to ensure this experience does not happen to others with disabilities.  Thank you.

Discrimination Against Hearing Ear Dogs


Photo by Richard Lautens, Toronto Star.

Photo by Richard Lautens, Toronto Star.

On Thursday April 18th at around 12:30 p.m., I attempted to go for lunch with my two work colleagues at a restaurant called Spring Rolls.  When we arrived, the manager told us we could not bring my Hearing Ear Dog in.  We immediately informed him that this was not a pet but a Hearing Ear Dog and as such was legally entitled to come into the restaurant.  He still continued to refuse to seat us, telling us first that Health Code laws prohibit this.  We told him this was nonsense and in fact the law allows me to bring a Hearing Ear Dog into the restaurant.  He still refused, saying that we cannot have a dog near other customers.  Again, we pointed out this was nonsense as well and the law allows us to be served.  He then proceeded to suggest we sit on the patio or in an upper area of the restaurant that was closed, but he would reopen so we would not be seen near anyone else.  We rejected those two options.  First, it was not warm outside and did not want to sit on the patio.  Second, segregation is also a form of discrimination.  We don’t segregate on the basis of skin colour, gender, or anything else, so why should I be segregated because of reliance on a Hearing Ear Dog?

After about 5 minutes of arguing, and his continual refusal to serve us, we were forced to leave.  We then proceeded to be served without any problems whatsoever at Jack Astors.

Lets review what the Ontario Human Rights Code says.

Ontario’s Human Rights Code  is a provincial law that gives everybody equal rights and opportunities without discrimination in the social areas of:

  1. employment
  2. accommodation
  3. goods, services and facilities
  4. contracts
  5. membership in vocational associations and trade unions

The Code’s goal is to prevent discrimination and harassment because of many areas (race, gender, age sexual orientation etc.), including disability.  Section 10 (1) of the Code defines “disability” as follows:

“because of disability” means for the reason that the person has or has had, or is believed to have or have had,

  1. any degree of physical disability, infirmity, malformation or disfigurement that is caused by bodily injury, birth defect or illness and, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, includes diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, a brain injury, any degree of paralysis, amputation, lack of physical co-ordination, blindness or visual impediment, deafness or hearing impediment, muteness or speech impediment, or physical reliance on a guide dog or other animal or on a wheelchair or other remedial appliance or device,
  2. a condition of mental impairment or a developmental disability,
  3. a learning disability, or a dysfunction in one or more of the processes involved in understanding or using symbols or spoken language,
  4. a mental disorder, or
  5. an injury or disability for which benefits were claimed or received under the insurance plan established under theWorkplace Safety and Insurance Act, 1997

The two relevant themes are that I was discriminated in the social area of “goods and services” due to a “disability“.

Through various contacts, two media outlets were contacted and agreed to do a story on this issue.  The Toronto Star published an excellent article.  Here are the contents of the article.

Interesting how the manager has modified his story to the Toronto Star reporter.  The article states the following.

“At the Spring Rolls restaurant on Queen St. W., Rupinder Bahl told the Star the reason Stelmacovich and his friends were offered seats upstairs or outside was because the tables at the front were either occupied or reserved. Stelmacovich, however, says many of the tables up front were empty.

When the restaurateur was asked if he understood that under Ontario’s Human Rights Code Stelmacovich cannot be refused proper service, Bahl said the dog didn’t need to be inside because he had friends who could help. Asked if he refused proper service he said, “Of course not.””

Point of clarification.  The restaurant was almost three quarters empty.  He never mentioned the need for reservations, this is something he made up after our incident.  The only reason he offered the upstairs area was to segregate us.  This was a special area used for parties and events and was not open to the public.  There was absolutely no reason that we could not have been seated in the normal part of the restaurant.

In addition to this article, the CBC also sent a camera crew to interview us.  This segment appeared on CBC on Saturday April 20 on the local Toronto 6 p.m. news.  Here is a link to the story of the CBC website.

Again, he brings up the lie about reservations.  Here is the relevant quote:

“The manager of the Spring Rolls restaurant didn’t want to appear on camera — but over the phone he told CBC News it was never his intention to offend anyone. He said the empty tables were for other patrons with reservations and he offered to welcome Stelmacovich back with a free meal.”

I told both reporters from the CBC and the Toronto Star that I will not file a Human Rights Complaint under the following conditions:

  1. That he acknowledges that he made a serious mistake by discriminating against me.
  2. He apologizes for this error.
  3. That he guarantees that it will not happen again not only to myself, but to anyone who relies on a service dog.

He failed to do that.  As such, I will be forced to proceed with a formal Human Rights Complaint.

Some may wonder, why bother with the hassle? My experience recently in Ottawa is the reason.  Before, when I had Amie, my previous Hearing Ear Dog, I had some incidents with taxi cab drivers.  However, when I went again to Ottawa with Flora, all the taxi cab drivers were excellent.  I asked one driver what he knew about the rules on service dogs  and he replied “Yes, we have be clearly instructed we must take people with service dogs”.  Obviously someone took a stand, and by doing so, made my life easier.

Now it is time for me to return the favor.  So this is not about me, or Flora, and a free meal.  This is about all people who rely on service dogs and face this kind of discrimination every day.

Keep your free meal buddy.

How Do You Know You Need a Wireless Microphone?


In my last blog posting, I spoke about the technologies available to help you hear better in noise.  These included:

  1. Directional Microphones
  2. Fixed Gain Wireless Systems.
  3. Dynamic Wireless Systems. ZoomLink+ Transmitter

But how do you know what technology you need?  This is a very important question that needs to be answered right away before you decide what kind of hearing devices you wish to purchase.  Let’s say you need Dynamic Wireless system in addition to hearing aids.  If you have sufficient financial resources at your disposal, you may wish to purchase a premium hearing and a wireless system.  This is the best of all worlds.  But if you have limited resources, you may wish to spend less money on your hearing aids in order to have enough money left over for a wireless system.

It is also important to know this in order to have realistic expectations about your hearing instruments.  If your hearing loss requires that you use a wireless microphone system in order to hear in a noisy environment, you can do countless hours of hearing aid fine tuning with your Hearing Care Professional and you are still not going to hear better in noise.  Its simple physics: a Dynamic Wireless microphone placed in close proximity to a speaker’s mouth will always outperform a microphone at the ear level.

Ideally you will have answered this question early in your hearing device selection process.  Here’s how this question can be answered:

  1. Experience with Existing Hearing Devices.  If you already have hearing aids or a CI equipped with directional microphones and you are still struggling to hear better in a noisy environment, you will have answered your question about the need for a wireless system.
  2. Experience with a Bluetooth Wireless Microphone.  As I mentioned in my previous blog posting, a Bluetooth Wireless Microphone will provide better performance than a directional microphone on your hearing devices.  But if you are still struggling with the Bluetooth mic, there are still significant improvements that can be obtained with a Dynamic Wireless System.  The microphones cut noise better, and the dynamic nature of the system will reduce the amount of noise your hearing aid or CI microphones will pick up.
  3. Experience with a Fixed Gain Wireless System.  Similar to the above, if you already have tried a fixed gain system (Eg Phonak Campus, SmartLink SX, ZoomLink or EasyLink; Oticon Amigo, Comfort Audio Digisystem) and are still having trouble, then a Dynamic System will provide additional benefits particularly at noise levels at around 70 dB or greater.  This is about the level of a restaurant.
  4. Audiogram Approach.  Most people with moderate-severe hearing loss or greater will require more than a directional microphone on the hearing instruments.
  5. Direct Assessment of Hearing in Noise Abilities.  There are several tests that your Hearing Care Professional can perform to help determine right away what kind of technology you need.  The one I am most familiar with is the LiSN-S PGA test and as such I will highlight this test in the remainder of this blog posting.

LiSN-S PGA stands for Listening in Spatialized Noise.  Performed under headphones, a virtual 3D space is created with target sentences coming from the front and distracting sentences are coming from the left and the right.  The PGA stands Prescribed Gain Amplifier.  The stimuli are amplified according your hearing test results.  So it simulates the way you would hear in a noisy environment if you had hearing aids and an omni-directional microphone.

LISN-S PGA

LiSN-S PGA accurately measures your ability to understand speech in noise as if you were wearing hearing instruments (amplification), and by your performance on LiSN-S PGA with normative data stored in the software, LiSN-S PGA predicts accurately the your performance in noisy situations compared to normal hearing listeners of the same age, and if the predicted performance is not good, LiSN-S PGA gives you clear, individual, technology recommendations how to improve speech understanding in noise. So based on your responses to the sentences, you get an evidence based recommendation.

The test takes about 5 minutes to perform.  You will hear noise first coming into both ears.  It will seem like the noise is coming from the sides.  Then you will hear a sentence that sounds like it is coming from in front of you.  Your task is simply to repeat back the sentence.  Your Hearing Care Professional simply needs to click on how many words you repeated correctly.  The computer will then automatically make the next sentence softer or louder depending on how well you did.  The test stops when the software has sufficient results to make a recommendation for you.

Condition 1

Here is what the recommendations screen looks like:

recommendation

Personally I find it interesting that difficulty hearing in noise is one of the most common complaints that a person reports when getting a hearing test, yet most hearing care professionals never assess this.  Far too often we wait for a patient to fail with the hearing devices before we explore additional noise reduction technologies.  This is unacceptable.  Why frustrate people with hearing loss unnecessarily?

I know many Hearing Care Professionals are thinking, “Yes Peter, but many patients won’t use additional microphones, so I don’t bother introducing this technology”.  This thinking is also unacceptable.  You are making a pre-determination and denying people hearing loss technology that is critical to helping them function in our noisy world.   Our duty, as Hearing care Professionals is to help people with hearing loss make an informed decision.  Yes, some may reject such technologies initially, but it is still their right to be informed.

For more information about the LiSN-S PGA, click here.

For more information about the development of the LiSN-S PGA test click this link here.