Captioning on In-Flight Entertainment.


Continental Airlines has Captioned Entertainment

I have been regularly zipping across Canada on airlines for about 15 years now.  In all these years, I have never been able to fully enjoy the in-flight entertainment as it is not captioned.  We have had captioning on television since the mid 1990’s, yet here we are in the year 2012 and in-flight entertainment is not captioned,

This is unacceptable and a human rights issue as far as I am concerned. People with hearing loss pay full fare for my tickets, and would like to have equal access.  We are not a small number…approximately 10% of the population has a hearing loss.  The noise levels of a plane would make listening to the in-flight entertainment challenging for pretty much all degrees of hearing loss.

I did some preliminary research on the internet to explore this issue and have learned that at least one airline, Continental, will provide captioned entertainment.  See this link for more information.  If one airline can do it, then they all can.

I plan on taking the following steps:

1. Start with a letter to both Air Canada and West Jet requesting captioning on in-flight entertainment.  I do not expect this will have much effect, but I am a firm believer in giving everyone a fair chance before going for more drastic measures.

2. If I do not receive a satisfactory reply from either of these two airlines within 30 days, I will next make a complaint to Ontario Human Rights Commission.  Specifically, there is the Ontario Human Rights Legal Support Centre that can assist in making a formal complaint to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.

3. In addition, I plan to make a complaint to the Canadian Transportation Agency.  They have been mandated to make make transportation accessible to all persons with disabilities. Lets see what they can do.

4. I am not sure if the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) has any jurisdiction here.  But I will also use their website complaint mechanism to see if they can help.

I will keep you all updated on my progress in this endeavor.  Wish me luck!

Hearing Not Required…


Shumka Dancers

I took my parents to see a Ukrainian Dance Troupe last night called “Shumka”.  This group based out of Edmonton Alberta (surprise, surprise) has been in existence for 50 years.  They put on an absolutely dazzling performance.  While my expertise on the art of dance is limited, I am certainly not ignorant to the elements of fine dance as I have been to about 10 ballets in my lifetime.  Last night’s performance, at least from my perspective, was every bit as technically sophisticated and beautiful as a ballet, but a heck of a lot more fun!

As I was watching and enjoying the performance, it dawned upon me that I was fully enjoying this event just like everyone else in the audience.  Sure, the dances were choreographed to music, but I heard that well enough. The music was not the focus of the performance, it was the dancers- their athleticism and ornate costumes.  I really did not need much hearing to enjoy this activity.  I just sat, clapped, and cheered like everyone else.

It seems that so many regularly occurring things in life are affected by hearing loss. Work, communication, enjoying television, theater, movies, music, going to a restaurant,  and going for drinks with friends, all require both technical assistive devices such as an FM system, and some accommodations from my family and friends in order for me to participate.  Not that I am complaining…I would not want to miss out on these important activities.  I am grateful that these devices grant me the necessary access and improve my ability to participate.

But its also nice to find exceptions to this through activities that are not taxing on the ears.  For me, these typically include hobbies such as fishing, archery, kayaking, hiking and photography.   And last night, it included dance!

Sometimes I wish I enjoyed more of the visual arts.  I have certainly tried…I have been to the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Musee du Louvre and Musee d’Orsay in Paris, the Met and MoMA in New York to name a few.  Sadly, visual art does not speak to me the same way that music does.  Perhaps I lack the training and education to fully appreciate the immensity of meaning these pieces of expression may hold.

In any event, there is much to enjoy in this world that does not require good hearing.  I find that it is quite beneficial to seek out these “hearing not required” activities to enrich our lives.  It also provides necessary relief from the challenges of hearing loss.  Its good for you!

For Family Day today, we are off to the Bell Lightbox (Home of the Toronto International Film Festival) to see a French film called Lancelot du Lac.  It will have English subtitles for all the viewers, not just me.  It should be fun!

What’s It Like To Have A Deafened Father.


This week’s entry was written by a person of whom I am immensely proud of and adore: my son Alexander.


Alex and Amie in Algonquin Park

Growing up with a father with a significant hearing loss is an experience that I have lived with for 17 years. As I write this, I am awaiting my father’s summation of morning routines, in which he will put his “ears” on, as I so boldly used to state when I was younger. This of course referring to the hearing aid and cochlear implant that he must put on each day before I can speak with him. Having a deafened father is not something that I see as common where we reside, so when I speak of this upbringing, it can only be based purely on my experiential knowledge and very little external influences.

There are many things that shape my father as the man that he is and the father that he is, and whilst his disability is undoubtedly a significant trait; with the power of today’s technology, it is not a difficult one to deal with. Certain aspects of my upbringing in this regard are difficult to recollect, as I have been accustomed to it being reality. And not reality in some form of bleak, cold, hard sense, but rather that I have never known any different. Growing up with a deafened father forces you to adapt to certain mannerisms that are prevalent in all people with this condition. Whether it means patiently waiting for my father to put on his hearing aid and cochlear implant before engaging in a conversation, or knowing to always get his attention by means of small hand signs or light physical contact, these things have become second nature. My father’s ability to engage in conversation and interact with me on a day to day basis is in no way diminished by his hearing loss, and if anything has increased the intimacy of our most heartfelt conversations. I say this because if his body language does not read as being fully immersed in the topic at hand, then I know from experience, and due to the fact that he would have difficulty expressing an opinion if he had not been fully listening and reading my lips that his response would seem distracted. This allows for a much more human feel to our household, as it removes a large majority of the potential for noisy dinner conversations, shouting across the house and scattered voicemail reminders of family plans.

As a young child, my father’s hearing loss did not provide any genuine troubles. The teasing on the matter from my cohorts would only exist as an extension of an insecurity, and a lack of terms to call me after the basics would be used up. However, as my mother and father instilled the values of confidence and compassion in me at a young age, I had the ability to recognize this as no substantial attack towards my father, but rather a last resort due to a lack of genuine teasing to conjure up. To draw upon a previous point, part of the reason it never bothered me is because I did not, and could not ever know any different. This was my father they were speaking about. Why should I care if they wish to tease, when my father had done so much for me? This was never became a prominent issue.

One joy that I have had the pleasure of sharing with my father is that of music. As he has mentioned in previous entries, playing and listening to music is no easy task for anyone with any form of hearing loss. This has been a struggle for my father since day one, yet he never hesitated to give me his utmost support when I decided to pursue music as a passion. In fact, he joined me on this and our basement (or man’s den as my mother would say) has now been transformed into a small recording studio. The values that music has brought to my life are innumerable and without my father’s utmost support, I may not have gone nearly as far as I have. Music has allowed me to grow intellectually, emotionally and has given me confidence I needed after traveling to play shows to people across Ontario. None of this would have been possible without my father’s support, and the many long nights spent listening to me practice and helping me progress. Also, as mentioned in previous entries, a huge silver lining in the cloud, is our hearing ear dog Amie. Growing up with a dog has changed the very essence of who I am, and my love for animals and living beings has grown to be insatiable. My father and I have matching Amie tattoos, which is something I will carry proudly with me forever. When my father’s laser eye surgery took a turn for the worse, as a child I jokingly stated “This is a good thing Dad! We can get a seeing eye dog now too!”. These are two great things that have come out of my father’s hearing loss, that I feel a father without such a condition may not have been able to offer to the same extent.

All in all, growing up under this has had immense implications on me. It does go against many of the typical father son paradigms that exist in the all too unrelatable parenting advice columns, and it has most definitely been different. It goes without saying that there are ups and downs, as in any family relationship, but the majority of them have not been anything that any other family would not face. It has changed my outlook on people with disabilities, culture, society, technology and opened my eyes to many things that I would not have been aware of before. In many regards, it truly has shaped me into who I am today.

 

Thanks son!

Song Sample and Gig Date!


Just a quick post this time.  My band, Below the Belt, will be playing at the Greyfriars Pub in Oakville, Ontario, Canada on Saturday March 3rd from 7-10 pm.

Exciting, because we will be playing 24 songs (2 full sets, we usually only get to play one set).  Also, my son’s band will be opening for us with a set of original material.  They are called Sticks and Stones and they are incredible.

My band does fun covers of songs from the 60’s all the way to present time.  We do songs by artists such as the Rolling Stones, Beatles, Big and Rich, John Mayer, Maroon 5, The Clash, the Tragically Hip, The Black Crowes etc.

We will be raising money for a organization called We Listen International.  This organization, headed by my friend Warren Esterbrooks, provides professional education, training and consultative services for professionals around the world in the fields of Auditory-Verbal Therapy, Auditory Rehabilitation, and Auditory Learning who work with children, teens and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families.

And now for your listening enjoyment, here is a sample of my band covering Stuck in the Middle With You.  Click Here.