Hearing during the Holidays.


The Holiday Season is now upon us.  There are work Holiday parties, Christmas parties in the neighborhood, Christmas or Hanukkah family dinners, you name it.  And they all have a couple of things in common:

  • It is noisy
  • Alcohol is usually served
  • The main activity is talking and listening.

These functions are not easy for people with hearing loss.  We function best in quiet settings and smaller groups where there is no competing noise.  Moreover we need to concentrate harder to communicate, so remaining sober and unintoxicated is a must.

You don't want to be like this guy.

Given that you will be going to places in which there is a high noise level, you need equipment and strategies on how to communicate in this environment.

So here is the Stelma Survival Christmas Guide for People with Hearing Loss.

  1. If you have a mild loss of hearing, you must use a hearing aid with a good Directional Microphone.  As I discussed in a previous blog entry, these microphones will pick up the person talking in front of you and reduce the noise behind you.
  2. Due to the high noise level of these functions, people with moderate, moderate-severe, severe, or profound  losses of hearing will definitely require an FM system attached to the hearing device (hearing aid or cochlear implant).
  3. You need to set your FM system microphone to the SuperZoom position for maximum noise reduction.
  4. If it is a cocktail party type of event, you will be standing and talking.  So you will place the FM transmitter in your left hand and your refreshing beverage in your right hand.
  5. When conversing, you will point the transmitter at the person you wish to communicate with.  We call this the Reporter Style of using an FM system.  Also make sure you hold the transmitter correctly.  See this video clip for more details.
  6. Remember to use Specific Requests for Clarification if you misunderstand.  For example instead of “what?”, say “Can you repeat the last part you said?”.  See my earlier blog entry on “What’s Wrong with Saying What
  7. Try to position yourself in areas with lower noise.  So if the music is blasting in the living room, move to the kitchen or dining room where these is less noise.
  8. Try to position yourself in areas with better lighting.  Again, if the living room is dark, stay in the kitchen where there is better lighting.
  9. Keep your alcohol consumption to a minimum.  It takes a lot of concentration for us people with hearing loss to communicate and alcohol gets in the way.  Not to mention drinking and driving is illegal.  I typically drink Gin and Tonics, but I alternate with mineral water and lime.  That way nobody bugs me about not having a drink in my hand.

If anyone else has some strategies that they use for coping with Holiday Parties, I would love to hear from you.

Happy Holidays everyone!

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